Ocasio-Cortez On Paying For Expensive ‘Medicare for All’ Plan: ‘You Just Pay For It’

November 6th, 2018
NEW YORK, NY - JULY 12: Congressional nominee Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez stands with Zephyr Teachout after endorsing her for New York City Public Advocate on July 12, 2018 in New York City. The two liberal candidates held the news conference in front of the Wall Street bull in a show of standing up to corporate money. Ocasio-Cortez shocked the Democratic political community recently after an upset win against Representative Joe Crowley in the New York Democratic primary. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Democratic New York congressional candidate Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is still struggling to explain how she expects to pay for her expensive “Medicare for All” plan.

 

[WATCH: Relevant part starts at around the 7:00 mark]

Ocasio-Cortez, who upset incumbent Rep. Joe Crowley in the Democratic primary, has repeatedly been unable to answer how she will pay for her socialistic policies. A study by the George Mason University Mercatus Center claims Medicare for All would cost $32.6 trillion in government spending over 10 years.

During an interview with Jorge Ramos last Thursday, Ocasio-Cortez said she is “puzzled” that people keep asking her how the country can afford socialized medicine. (RELATED: Obama Endorses Socialist Ocasio-Cortez)

 

“People often say, like, ‘how are you going to pay for it?’ And I find the question so puzzling, because, how do you pay for something that’s more affordable?” Ocasio-Cortez said.

 

BOSTON, MA – OCTOBER 01: New York Democratic congressional candidate Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez speaks at a rally calling on Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ) to reject Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court on October 1, 2018 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Scott Eisen/Getty Images)

Ocasio-Cortez’s claim that Medicare for All would be cheaper than the current health system is inaccurate. While the Mercatus Center study estimated drug prices would fall under Medicare for All, higher demand would still significantly drive up costs.

“How do you pay for cheaper rent?” she said. “You just pay for it. You’re paying more now!”

Follow Amber on Twitter

Amber Athey

Media and Breaking News Editor